Tag Archives: tips and tricks

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

Bedroom curtains are important for privacy, but they should also help create a peaceful atmosphere that inspires rest and relaxation. This was not the case in this city condo, so we removed the old curtains from the window and started from scratch to create beautiful window treatments without having to pull out a big sewing machine or a ton of equipment. These no-sew curtains can be made for any room of the house, and this technique can be used to make sheers, curtains or valances.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

Because the home is located near other homes, a window covering offering plenty of privacy is a must. Natural light is also important to the homeowner, so we decided on a two layer window treatment with a textured sheer and a neutral, natural material for the curtain.

Supplies:

  • Sheer fabric
  • Curtain fabric
  • Tape measure
  • Scissors
  • Fusible Web (¾” for regular and heavy fabric; ⅜” for lightweight fabric)
  • Pins
  • Iron
  • Ironing board
  • Curtain Rods (We used 2 tension rods since these curtains are nestled into the window frame)

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

Step 1: Choose your fabric and measure the appropriate length for your window and curtains. Add 5” on to the length you want your curtains to be. These curtains are 62” long when finished, so we cut the fabric to 67”. To make it easier, we left the fabric as wide as it originally came.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

Step 2: Make a 1” fold on the long sides of your fabric and pin into place. Press fabric with your iron to make a definitive crease; remove the pins.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

Step 3: Pick up hem fold and insert a line of fusible web in the crease. Trim the fusible web to the edge of the fabric, and fold the hem over the top.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

Step 4: Use a dry iron to press the seam, sealing the hem and creating a nice, clean edge.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

Step 5: Repeat Steps 2-4 on the bottom of your curtain. You don’t have to make an angled corner, but it does make a nice, clean look to the bottom corners of your curtains.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

To make your corners, press a corner fold into the fabric, then add a triangle shaped piece of webbing under the corner flap and iron it into place. Do this on both bottom corners.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

Then, cut the fusible web on an angle and measure a strip across the bottom, just as you did on the other sides. Iron the webbing into the crease to create a hem, as before.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

Step 6: To make the top of the curtain, where the rod will go, make your 1 inch hem as before. Then, repeat the process with a 3” hem, placing the fusible web where the fabric meets, instead of in the crease. Iron the web into place. This creates a 2” pocket for your curtain rod.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

You’re finished! One curtain panel is complete. Repeat the steps for your second curtain panel. Follow the same steps to create a sheer panel and put it on a separate curtain rod. Make sure to iron your curtains with lots of steam (and the Durathon iron has lots of steam!) before hanging them, so you don’t have any creases or wrinkles.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

To hang the curtains, put up the sheer in the back and the curtain panels in the front, creating a layered look that allows the light to shine through.

DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon DIY No-Sew Curtains Tutorial from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach #Durathon

 

To view our complete line of Durathon irons, click here.

 

 



January Juicing Tips from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

It’s not always easy to eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables. That’s why so many people love juicing. It’s one of the easiest ways to increase your daily intake of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients found in these healthful foods. Whether you are juicing to lose weight, feel more energetic, improve your overall health or just to make super fresh bloody mary mix, our tips will help make the world of juicing a little more familiar to you.

Some health proponents believe juicing is a great way to boost nutrition in the typical Western diet. These experts and the USDA all agree a key recommendation for improving health is to “increase vegetable and fruit intake” and “eat a wide variety of vegetables, especially dark green and red and orange vegetables and beans and peas.” (USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, page 34.)

What are other benefits to juicing aside from nutrition? When you juice at home, you will be able to capture the freshest taste possible and you can combine different types of produce to create interesting flavor combinations. For example, if you dislike kale, but know it’s good for you, you can juice it with sweet fruits such as berries and apples to make the taste more palatable. You might even surprise yourself and fall in love with it!

January Juicing Tips from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

Preparation

Wash produce thoroughly before juicing. Peel any citrus fruits or thick-skinned fruits or vegetables. Remove any large seeds or pits.

Save the Pulp

The pulp that’s left behind after juicing contains lots of healthy fiber, which can be used in many ways. For example, apples and pears contain pectin fiber, which is great for thickening and gently sweetening recipes. Pulp can be used in soups, stocks, casseroles, and desserts to add more flavor and nutrition. Similar to juice, pulp should be used immediately or frozen for later use.

More Juicing Tips

  • Juicing avocados or bananas produces a puree rather than a juice.
  • Leafy vegetables will process more easily if formed into compact balls or rolls before inserting them into the food chute.
  • One pound of produce usually yields one cup (8 ounces) of juice.
  • If you are working with large quantities of fruits and vegetables, you may need to stop the juice extractor to empty the pulp bin and rinse the cutter/strainer. Doing so will ensure you get the maximum amount of extraction possible.
  • Use a sieve, coffee filter or layer of cheesecloth to strain juice if you want to remove foam or create a clearer juice.
  • Juice should be served immediately because the flavor and nutrient content decreases rapidly when juices are stored.
  • You can store fresh juice in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. Separation is normal.
  • Substitute fruit or vegetable juices for stock or water in cooking.
  • Some pulp remaining in juice is normal; it increases the flavor and nutritive value.
  • The softer the texture of a fruit or vegetable, the thicker the juice it will produce. The juice extracted from these fruits, such as apricots, peaches, pears, melons and strawberries is known as nectar.

 

Juicing Information
For an interesting infographic all about juicing, click here.

Recipes
For a list of juicing recipes from the Hamilton Beach Test Kitchen, click here.

Juice Extractors
For more information on juice extractors offered by Hamilton Beach, click here.

 


Thanksgiving Turkey in a Roaster Oven from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

 

We at Hamilton Beach have made more than a few turkeys in our time, and we know turkey is on everyone’s mind come November. We’re here to help with a few tips, tricks and suggestions to make sure your Thanksgiving centerpiece turns out perfectly.

1. Choose the right size turkey.

The general rule for turkey is to buy one and a half pounds of turkey per person to allow for seconds and leftovers. Also, take into consideration the size of your oven or roaster oven. If you feel like an extra-large turkey will be too arduous or you can’t find a large enough bird, you can cook two smaller turkeys and avoid the inevitable fight for the drumsticks.

2. Defrost the turkey.

If you are buying a fresh turkey, you don’t need to worry about this step. If you are buying a frozen turkey, you’ll need to plan out your defrosting time well in advance. It is important to keep the turkey cold while it’s thawing; the refrigerator method is easiest. Place the turkey on a rimmed tray in the fridge in its original wrapping. For a whole turkey, allow 24 hours for every 4-5 pounds. For a turkey breast, allow 1-2 days.

3. To stuff or not to stuff…that is the question.

If you are stuffing the bird, use ½ cup stuffing per pound of turkey for turkeys under 10 pounds and ¾ cup per pound for turkeys more than 10 pounds. The ingredients can be prepared ahead of time, but don’t mix the wet and dry ingredients until just before filling the turkey cavity. Add the stuffing only when you are about to put your turkey in the oven, and fill it loosely because the stuffing will expand as it cooks. You can place the stuffing in cheesecloth before placing it in the cavity to make removing it a cinch. Add 30 extra minutes to the roasting time, and use a thermometer to ensure the center of the stuffing reaches at least 165 degrees F. Remove the stuffing before carving the turkey.

4. Cook the turkey.

If using a regular oven to cook a whole turkey, estimate an hour of cooking time for every 4 pounds of turkey. A 12-14 pound turkey would take about 3-4 hours and a 20-24 pound turkey would take about 5-6 hours.

If using a roaster oven, your cooking time will be about half the time of a regular oven. The combination of the heating element being close to the turkey and the moist heat cooks food quickly. The 22 quart roaster ovens are designed to fit a turkey up to 24 pounds, and 18 quart roaster ovens will hold a turkey up to 18 pounds. Still, use a meat thermometer to be sure it’s thoroughly cooked.

5. Test for doneness.

The best guide to turkey doneness is a meat thermometer. Remove the turkey from the oven and insert the thermometer into the breast, avoiding bone. It should read at least 165 degrees F. Stuffing inside a bird should also reach 165 degrees F.

Follow the USDA recommendation for safe cooking temperatures. A chart of safe minimum cooking temperatures can be found here. For more information on food safety, visit foodsafety.gov.

6. Let it rest.

When your turkey is done, remove the turkey from the oven and tent it with foil. Allow it to rest for 20-30 minutes while you heat up side dishes and make the gravy. The rest allows juices to redistribute so your turkey will be moist and delicious.

7. Save the giblets, trimmings and carcass.

Get your money’s worth by using the extras from your turkey. Save the giblets and trimmings (minus the liver) and brown them on the stove. Drain the fat and simmer the extras with veggies and herbs to make a delicious stock for your gravy. Save the carcass and make a big batch of stock in a large pot with the veggies and herbs you didn’t use up.  Let it simmer for two hours and then strain the stock and discard the solids. Freeze it in pre-measured 1-cup bags so you can grab some when you cook a recipe calling for chicken stock. 



 

The edge of a pie crust always browns quicker than the rest of the pie, which can cause a burned crust and a ruined dessert. You can purchase a pie shield, but did you know it’s really simple to make your own from aluminum foil? Just add the foil protector at the beginning of baking when the pie is not too hot to easily fold over the edge, and remove it for the final 20 minutes of baking time. Here’s how it’s done.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

1. Cut a large piece foil in a square that is big enough to cover the entire pie.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

2. Fold the aluminum foil in half.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

3. And then fold into quarters.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

4. Cut the outer open sides of the foil into a rounded corner.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

5. Then cut the center, following the same curve, until you have about two inches of foil remaining. Discard the scraps.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

6. Carefully unfold the foil.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

7. Lay the foil circle over the pie, positioning it so the foil circle covers the outer edge of the crust.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

8. Lightly crimp the edges, so the foil doesn’t slide off. The edges are now protected, and the pie is ready to go in the oven.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

9. When there are 20 minutes left in the baking process, carefully remove the foil and place the pie back in the oven for the remainder of the cooking time.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

10. Now that you know this trick of the trade, you’ll be able to serve a beautiful pie with perfectly toasted crust.

 



There are a number of recipes this time of year that call for apples that are peeled, cored and sliced or chopped. You’ll be making applesauce, apple pie and apple crumble in no time. Here’s how to do it.

How to Core an Apple from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

1. Start by peeling off the top and bottom of your apple. This gives you a good start and end point for the rest of your peeling process and helps stabilize the apple by creating a flat bottom.

How to Core an Apple from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

2. Make your way around the apple, peeling away from your body for safety, until the entire apple is peeled.

How to Core an Apple from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

3. Discard the skin of the apple. You now have a perfectly peeled apple that is ready to be cut.

How to Core an Apple from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

4. Cut across the apple on either side of the stem, avoiding the core.

How to Core an Apple from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

5. Lay the center of the apple onto the cutting board to create a flat surface and cut around the core.

How to Core an Apple from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

6. Discard the core. The apples can be sliced or chopped, flat side down, according to your recipe.

How to Core an Apple from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

How to Core an Apple from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

How to Core an Apple from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach