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This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

In our Heritage Dish series, we feature Hamilton Beach employees and their favorite family recipes. This month, we highlight Pat Schweitzer, consumer test kitchen manager, and one of her favorite family dessert recipes inspired by life on a Jackson, Minnesota farm, Rhubarb Custard Pie.

In our family, it just wouldn’t be spring without mom’s Rhubarb Custard Pie. Tart rhubarb is the perfect complement to the sweet goodness of the custard on the bottom and the crunch of the crumb topping.

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

 

I grew up on a farm in southwest Minnesota. My mom Alyce traded in her teaching career to raise fruits, vegetables, chickens and her own brood of five children. At the end of her massive garden was a patch of rhubarb. If you’ve only seen the huge stalks in grocery stores, you have been missing the real thing! Rhubarb is a perennial vegetable that grows like crazy in cool weather, so it’s a natural for early Minnesota gardens. Although considered a vegetable, it’s mostly used like a fruit in desserts and jams. Only the stalk is edible, and the larger it grows, the more woody the stalk becomes and the less desirable it is for cooking.

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

If you had an abundance of rhubarb, you would make rhubarb cake, rhubarb bread, rhubarb crisp, rhubarb jam and, if you still had some left, you’d probably pass it on to friends and neighbors whose gardens were less productive. But despite rhubarb’s versatility, none of those treats compared to my Mom’s custard pie. Recently, as I was rummaging through my collection of handwritten recipes, I found four for this pie.I guess I wanted to be sure I had a copy!

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

My mom will tell you that one of her secrets to a perfect rhubarb pie is the pie pan. It is an all-aluminum deep dish pie pan. According to her, they don’t make them anymore, so she searches rummage sales, and when she finds them, she gives them to my sister, sisters-in-law and me. (Don’t tell her I now have two of them.)

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

Making this pie is so easy. You just chop up the rhubarb and mix it with eggs, milk, sugar and flour. The recipe cards vary on the amount of sugar, and one version has nutmeg added. I go with the lower amount of sugar and leave out the nutmeg. I prefer it to be pretty tart with the rhubarb flavor as the star. You then pour the mixture into a pastry crust and top it with the crumb topping. After baking, the custard magically sinks to the bottom and the tart rhubarb filling gets sandwiched in the middle by the crumb topping.

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com


Rhubarb Custard Pie
SERVES: 8

Ingredients
Pastry for 9-inch pie (Food Processor Pie Crust)
3 large eggs
3 Tablespoons milk
1 3/4 cups sugar
1/4 cup flour
4 cups sliced rhubarb
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 cup flour
Instructions
Preheat oven to 425°F.
Prepare Food Processor Pie Crust and place in 9-inch deep dish pie pan.
Lightly beat eggs. Add milk, sugar and flour. Stir in rhubarb. Pour into pie shell.
Mix topping ingredients until crumbly. Spread on top of rhubarb mixture.
Bake 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted in center comes out clean. Cool before cutting. Refrigerate remaining pie after serving.
Everyday Good Thinking http://everydaygoodthinking.com/

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With the Soft Scrape™ Hand Mixer, you can mix without having to constantly stop to scrape the bowl. That’s because its unique Soft Scrape™ attachments thoroughly incorporate ingredients as you mix.



 

The edge of a pie crust always browns quicker than the rest of the pie, which can cause a burned crust and a ruined dessert. You can purchase a pie shield, but did you know it’s really simple to make your own from aluminum foil? Just add the foil protector at the beginning of baking when the pie is not too hot to easily fold over the edge, and remove it for the final 20 minutes of baking time. Here’s how it’s done.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

1. Cut a large piece foil in a square that is big enough to cover the entire pie.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

2. Fold the aluminum foil in half.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

3. And then fold into quarters.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

4. Cut the outer open sides of the foil into a rounded corner.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

5. Then cut the center, following the same curve, until you have about two inches of foil remaining. Discard the scraps.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

6. Carefully unfold the foil.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

7. Lay the foil circle over the pie, positioning it so the foil circle covers the outer edge of the crust.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

8. Lightly crimp the edges, so the foil doesn’t slide off. The edges are now protected, and the pie is ready to go in the oven.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

9. When there are 20 minutes left in the baking process, carefully remove the foil and place the pie back in the oven for the remainder of the cooking time.

How to Protect a Pie Crust from Burning from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @HamiltonBeach

10. Now that you know this trick of the trade, you’ll be able to serve a beautiful pie with perfectly toasted crust.

 



Lemon meringue pie and I go way back. When I was a kid, it was an occasional treat, and when I was a teenager it was something I could scarf down without thinking of the scale. When I had minor surgery in my early twenties, it was all I wanted when I woke up. And now, it’s something I want to know how to make from scratch, so I can serve it to my family or bring it to a party.

I’ve never made a lemon meringue pie, so I asked the test kitchen for help and learned a lot along the way. Today, I am sharing ten tips I learned for making lemon meringue pie along with a recipe developed by the Test Kitchen for this post.

Lemon Meringue Pie from Everyday Good Thinking | @HamiltonBeach

 

10) Don’t overwork your dough.

The dough for this pie crust is made in the food processor and only needs to be pulsed gently. It will be ready to take out of the food processor when it forms pea-sized pieces of dough. You don’t want it to form a dough ball before you take it out. Then, chill the dough before rolling it out so the butter doesn’t melt before baking. Pat says this is important because “when baking, the flour mixture sets around the butter and the butter melts to form the flaky layers in the pastry.”

9) Use non-stick aluminum foil when par-baking your crust.

When par-baking (or blind baking) crust, you need to weigh down the bottom of the pie so it doesn’t puff up or bubble. The easiest way to protect your pie from the pie weights or dried beans is to use non-stick aluminum foil facing down on the crust. When it’s done baking, you can pull it right up without any sticking.

8) Let your curd get really thick.

As your curd cooks, it will thicken. Since the transformation from liquid to goop happens so quickly, it’s tempting to take the curd off the stove too soon. Let it thicken to the point where it is a smooth paste. When you add the lemon juice, it will loosen the curd, so you want it to be thick going in.

7) Use the three-bowl method.

It’s very important that not a speck of egg yolk be present in the egg whites to create meringue. The yolks have fat and fats break down meringue. “A tiny bit of oil can make egg whites flop,” reminds Pat. Separate the egg over one bowl, then place the yolk in another bowl. Transfer the successfully separated egg whites to the third bowl one at a time. This prevents one mistake from ruining your whole batch of egg whites.

6) Use fresh eggs.

Older eggs whip up faster than fresh eggs because the whites are thinner and foam more quickly. However, fresh eggs create a more stable meringue because they are less alkaline. They are best for forming foams because they have more ovomucin (a thick protein) that traps air easily; it weakens as eggs age. Using a stand mixer makes the slightly longer whipping time of fresh eggs easier to manage, and the planetary motion of the whisk ensures they foam evenly.

Bonus tip: Chilled fresh eggs make separating whites and yolks easier because the yolks are stronger and more likely to stay intact when the egg is cracked.

Lemon Meringue Pie from Everyday Good Thinking | @HamiltonBeach

 

5) Add cornstarch to your meringue.

While the mild acid in the cream of tartar helps stabilize the meringue, adding a little bit of cornstarch to the meringue helps it firm up and retain it’s shape because it absorbs extra moisture. This also suppresses weeping. As Pat says, “it helps prevent the ‘beading’ of moisture on top of the meringue after it is cooled.”

4) Don’t overbeat your meringue.

If you overbeat your meringue, you will not be able to make beautiful peaks and valleys with your spatula and it can deflate. Be sure to gradually add in the sugar as soon as your egg whites foam so it has time to dissolve without the risk of overbeating. According to Pat, “the meringue should be stiff and glossy and the sugar should be dissolved.  If it breaks down or separates, it’s overbeaten.”

3) Don’t cool your curd.

Weeping is when syrup from the meringue forms in beads or puddles on the surface of the meringue. It can be caused by an over- or underbeaten meringue, undissolved sugar or too high an oven temperature. Another common form of weeping takes place when the syrup weeps from the bottom of the meringue, creating a slippery layer between the curd and the meringue topping. To avoid this, do not cool the curd after placing it in the pie crust. Adding the meringue to a hot or warm curd cooks the meringue from the bottom and helps bond the two layers.

2) If you make a mistake, try again.

Do you want to know where I messed up? See tip #4. I accidentally beat my meringue until it actually stuck inside the balloon whisk on the stand mixer. It no longer created beautiful peaks, and it looked lumpy instead of smooth and glossy. If this happens to you, don’t be afraid to dump it and start over with a clean bowl. It’ll be better in the end to get it right.

1) Don’t cut the pie before it is cool.

I should have written this in all caps; it’s number one for a reason! If you cut the pie too soon, the curd will break and your meringue could fall. How do I know? I did it. “The pie plate must be cool to the touch when you place your hand on the bottom center,” says Laurie. Once it has cooled completely, it’s time to dig in. You may even need to have seconds.

 Lemon Meringue Pie from Everyday Good Thinking | @HamiltonBeach

 


Lemon Meringue Pie

For perfectly whipped meringue, we used our Eclectrics® All-Metal Stand Mixers. We recommend the Stack & Snap™ 10 Cup Food Processor (70720) for easy pie crust in seconds.
Crust
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
2 teaspoons lemon zest
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup unsalted butter, well chilled, cut into 1-inch pieces
3 Tablespoons ice water
Filling
1 1/4 cups sugar
1/3 cup cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups water
4 large egg yolks, lightly beaten
2 Tablespoons butter
2 teaspoons lemon zest
1/2 cup lemon juice
Meringue
4 egg whites, room temperature
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/2 cup sugar
2 teaspoons cornstarch
For Crust
Combine flour, lemon zest, sugar, salt and chilled butter pieces in food processor bowl.
Pulse the mixture several times JUST until the butter is processed into pea-sized pieces. Do not over-process.
Adding 1 tablespoon at a time, sprinkle ice water through feed tube and process JUST until dough begins to come together. Add additional ice water if necessary. Small butter pieces should still be visible in dough.
Remove dough from bowl. Form dough into a disc about one inch thick. Wrap in plastic wrap and place in refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before rolling.
Sprinkle pastry cloth or parchment paper and rolling pin lightly with flour. Roll dough from center outward into a 13-inch diameter.
Grease pie pan lightly with butter to hold pastry in place and help with browning.
Transfer pastry to pie pan without stretching dough. Press pastry to bottom and sides of pan. Trim pastry to about 1 inch beyond edge of pan. Turn edge of pastry under and press to rim of pan.
Use a fork to prick bottom and sides of pastry. Chill pastry 30 minutes.
Preheat oven to 425°F.
Pre-bake the crust by lining the pastry crust with nonstick aluminum foil or buttered foil. Place the foil buttered or nonstick side down. Fill with pie weights or dry beans to about 3/4-inch deep.
Bake 15 minutes. Remove foil and beans.
Reduce oven temperature to 375°F. Continue baking pastry until light golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Cool.
For Filling
Combine sugar, cornstarch and salt in a medium saucepan. Gradually whisk in water.
Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly with a heat-resistant rubber scraper, until mixture thickens and boils. Boil and stir 1 minute.
Stirring in a little at a time, add about half of the hot mixture to the egg yolks. Then, stir the egg mixture back into the remaining mixture in the saucepan. Cook and stir, until the mixture begins to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook until mixture is very thick.
Remove from heat. Add butter. Then, add lemon zest and lemon juice. Pour into baked pie crust.
For Meringue
Preheat oven to 350°F.
Beat egg whites and cream of tartar with electric mixer on MEDIUM speed until foamy.
Combine sugar and cornstarch. Gradually increase speed to HIGH. Adding 1 tablespoon at a time, gradually add sugar mixture to egg whites. Continue beating until stiff and glossy.
Spread meringue over hot lemon filling, making sure to avoid leaving air pockets. Carefully seal meringue to edge of crust. Use back of spoon to make swirls and peaks in meringue.
Bake 10 to 15 minutes or until meringue is light brown. Cool.
Cover and refrigerate cooled pie.
Everyday Good Thinking http://everydaygoodthinking.com/

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