Tag Archives: Heritage Dish

Heritage Dish: Beef on Weck from Buffalo, New York - Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

In our Heritage Dish series, we feature Hamilton Beach employees and their favorite family recipes. This month, we highlight Matt Harrington, Communications Manager, and one of his favorite recipes from his hometown of Buffalo, New York.

One of the first things people ask upon meeting me is, “Where are you from?” Most likely, this is because they detect the hint of the Great Lakes in my accent. Even though I’ve lived in Virginia for 14 years, the nasally a’s and hard r’s of the Western New York dialect remain. If my accent doesn’t let people know I’m from Buffalo, the Sabres t-shirt and Bills hat are a surefire giveaway.

Heritage Dish: Beef on Weck from Buffalo, New York - Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Heritage Dish: Beef on Weck from Buffalo, New York - Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Growing up in Western New York, I’ve eaten my share of chicken wings, and I’m skeptical when restaurants outside of the region claim they serve “authentic” Buffalo wings. For some reason, the rest of the country hasn’t figured out how to properly fry and sauce a wing yet. Normally, I make my own wings (and you can, too, with a deep fryer and your favorite hot sauce and butter mixture). But, this post isn’t about our world-famous wing. Instead, I want to introduce you to Buffalo’s best-kept secret: the Beef on Weck.

Heritage Dish: Beef on Weck from Buffalo, New York - Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Heritage Dish: Beef on Weck from Buffalo, New York - Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

At first glance, it may appear to be a run-of-the-mill roast beef sandwich. But trust me, Arby’s has nothing on the Beef on Weck. The building blocks of the sandwich are simple: thinly sliced, rare roast beef, horseradish and the salty kummelweck roll.

Heritage Dish: Beef on Weck from Buffalo, New York - Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

If you don’t know what kummelweck is, it’s probably because a) you don’t speak German (kummelweck translates to “caraway seed roll”) or b) you don’t live in or know anyone from the City of Good Neighbors. A Beef on Weck without the “weck” is just roast beef on a roll. The food gods bestowed upon Western New York an abundance of kummelweck, available at every supermarket and bakery. If you live outside of the area, you’ll have to make your own. But don’t worry – it’s easy. You don’t even have to bust out your bread maker.

To make the buns, brush the tops of Kaiser or hard rolls with egg wash. Then, sprinkle on a mixture of coarse salt and caraway seeds (the saltier, the better). Pop them in a warmed oven or toaster oven for 3-4 minutes or until the egg wash is dry. That’s it! You’ve just turned an ordinary roll into the uniquely tasty kummelweck – the most important part of the Beef on Weck.

Heritage Dish: Beef on Weck from Buffalo, New York - Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

For the roast beef, you can prepare the roast yourself (remembering to catch all the drippings), or you can take the easy way out and order thinly sliced roast beef from the deli counter at your grocery store. Be sure to ask for the rarest meat they have. And – this is important – don’t forget to ask for the au jus. Some delis will have the juice from the roast available for purchase. If they don’t have it, you can pick up a couple quarts of beef stock or broth. While you’re at the supermarket, grab a jar of grated horseradish (not the creamy kind).

Heritage Dish: Beef on Weck from Buffalo, New York - Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Heritage Dish: Beef on Weck from Buffalo, New York - Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Heat the au jus or stock in a slow cooker on high heat. Use a fork to quickly dip each slice of roast beef in the hot juice and immediately place on the roll. Pile the beef high – big flavors call for a big sandwich – and spoon a healthy dollop of sinus-clearing horseradish on top of the meat. Before completing your beefy masterpiece, dip the underside of the top bun in the juice for a little extra flavor and moisture.

Heritage Dish: Beef on Weck from Buffalo, New York - Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Whenever I have family in town or friends over for a football or hockey game, I set up the buffet with the Beef on Weck assembly line. Not only is it delicious (even non-Buffalonians love it), but it takes very little time to prepare. It’s nice to have a little taste of home as we suffer through a season of our favorite teams not making the playoffs. Again.

 



Heritage Dish: Norwegian Fish Cakes - Atle Larsen shares his favorite recipe from his childhood in Norway on Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

In our Heritage Dish series, we feature Hamilton Beach employees and their favorite family recipes. This month, we highlight Atle Larsen, Group Brand Manager, and one of his favorite family recipes inspired by life on the water in Norway.

For as long as I can remember, fish and seafood have been an important part of my diet. Growing up near the ocean in Norway, I have fond memories of going down to the harbor, pumping rainwater out of the boat, and setting out to sea with my grandfather Emil to either set or pull fishing nets.

Heritage Dish: Norwegian Fish Cakes - Atle Larsen shares his favorite recipe from his childhood in Norway on Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Heritage Dish: Norwegian Fish Cakes - Atle Larsen shares his favorite recipe from his childhood in Norway on Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Peering over the side of the boat while my grandfather pulled the nets, I would watch in anticipation of what we might catch.  If I could see white (the belly of the fish), I knew we would go home with dinner.  Back at my grandparents’ house, one of us would clean and prepare the fish for dinner and the freezer.

Heritage Dish: Norwegian Fish Cakes - Atle Larsen shares his favorite recipe from his childhood in Norway on Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Heritage Dish: Norwegian Fish Cakes - Atle Larsen shares his favorite recipe from his childhood in Norway on Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

On occasion, we would bring back cod, which meant I could look forward to my then-favorite dinner: boiled cod with boiled potatoes and carrots along with melted butter and parsley. The more abundant pollock and haddock was either served pan fried or made into fiskekaker (fish cakes).

Heritage Dish: Norwegian Fish Cakes - Atle Larsen shares his favorite recipe from his childhood in Norway on Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Heritage Dish: Norwegian Fish Cakes - Atle Larsen shares his favorite recipe from his childhood in Norway on Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Fiskekaker presented a great opportunity to add some spices and flavors to the typically bland Norwegian diet. My grandmother would prepare fiskekaker just like the recipe described below. After browning, they were added to a saucepan full of brown sauce and were often served with boiled potatoes. Potatoes are a staple in my home region and were served every night in my home except when we had spaghetti bolognese. From the age of seven, it was my responsibility to peel the potatoes for dinner. I have always enjoyed the flavorful taste of fiskekaker and it brings back special memories of fishing as a child with my grandfather.

Heritage Dish: Norwegian Fish Cakes - Atle Larsen shares his favorite recipe from his childhood in Norway on Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Heritage Dish: Norwegian Fish Cakes - Atle Larsen shares his favorite recipe from his childhood in Norway on Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach


Norwegian Fish Cakes with Brown Gravy and Vegetables
SERVES: 6

Ingredients
3 medium potatoes, peeled, sliced in quarters lengthwise
6 large rainbow carrots, peeled, cut into 2” pieces
2 lbs boneless skinless white fish fillets (haddock, cod, etc)
1 ½ teaspoons salt
1 ½ teaspoons potato starch
½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
⅔ cup whole milk
¼ cup chopped fresh chives
⅔ cup all purpose flour, divided
6 Tablespoons vegetable or canola oil
½ yellow onion, chopped
3 cups beef stock, divided
2 Tablespoons Kitchen Bouquet
salt and pepper
Instructions
Put the potatoes and carrots in a medium pot and cover with cold, salted water by 2 inches. Bring to a boil over medium heat and cook until fork tender, about 15 minutes. Drain and set aside.
Place large chunks of fish and salt in work bowl of food processor and, using S-blade, pulse until coarsely chopped. Add potato starch and nutmeg and pulse to combine. Slowly add the milk, pulsing just until combined, and then the chives. Form the fish cakes into 12 round patties. Put 1/3 cup flour on a plate and dip patties to coat.
Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Working in batches, fry on both sides until crisp and golden. Drain on paper towels and set aside.
Cook onions in remaining oil while fish cakes are draining. When the onions are soft and translucent, remove them from the pan and set aside.
Add 1 cup stock and scrape the pan until all the browned bits have become loose. Continue to cook for 2-3 minutes to allow stock to reduce.
Add remaining ⅓ cup flour and whisk to combine until there are no visible lumps. Cook another 1-2 minutes, whisking continuously, until the gravy thickens and becomes smooth. Gradually add the Kitchen Bouquet and the rest of the stock to the pan and whisk until smooth, cooking another 4-5 minutes, or until the gravy is slightly thicker but not quite at desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
Reduce the heat to low. Add the onion, potatoes and carrots to the pan and stir into the gravy. Add the fish cakes to the pan and let simmer in brown gravy for 2-3 minutes, or until gravy has reached desired consistency. Serve fish cakes in the gravy with the vegetables.
Everyday Good Thinking http://everydaygoodthinking.com/

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Stack n Snap food processor on Everyday Good Thinking @hamiltonbeach

The Hamilton Beach® Stack & Snap™ 12 Cup Food Processors rely on robust motors to chop, slice, shred, mix and puree just about anything you put in the bowl. Hamilton Beach® Food Processors are the ultimate kitchen appliances, whether you’re cooking for two or prepping for a large family meal.



Heritage Dish: Kenyan Chicken Curry and Pilau Rice from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

In Kenyan culture, there are many different indigenous people with a variety of ethnic traditions. Kenya has had a long-standing relationship with foreign settlers for decades. This makes the food quite exciting as we draw our cooking methods, flavors and presentations from different regions, most commonly Arabic and Indian influences.

Heritage Dish: Kenyan Chicken Curry and Pilau Rice from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

While nearly all Kenyan tribes have their own staple foods, there are certain meals that continue to be present at every function, no matter the tribe. Growing up, it was not a gathering unless there was pilau, chapati and some kind of curry. These foods bring all tribal cultures together.

It was no different in our household. My siblings and I lived for those special occasions when we had guests, because we knew that we could have all three dishes as part of the same meal.

Perfecting the art of making these foods took me a long time. My sisters and I started out as helpers in the kitchen. As young girls, we were allowed to crush ginger and garlic using the pestle and mortar. (Today, I use a chopper, but the taste is definitely not the same. Mom always said the flavors are well drawn out when you crush ginger or garlic instead of chopping them.) Then, we learned to use knives safely and could peel potatoes and cube meat. By the time we were teenagers, we were able to cook the meal perfectly and let mom enjoy her guests without worries about what was going on in the kitchen.

Heritage Dish: Kenyan Chicken Curry and Pilau Rice from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

Pilau is a rice dish that sometimes had beef in it. Whether we made it with or without meat, there were a couple of secrets mom and the neighborhood women taught us if we wanted the perfect Pilau rice that didn’t stick together. “If it sticks together, people will be able to tell an amateur cook made it,” Mom would say. The first secret was to make sure the rice was well coated with olive oil before adding the water. The second was to let most of the water absorb into the rice, and then introduce low heat both above and below the pot.  Traditionally, that means using a Jiko and taking half of the hot coals to put on top of the cooking pot lid, which would then provide the heat from above. In modern day, we use convection baking or a rice cooker to allow uniform absorption of the liquid into the rice.

Heritage Dish: Kenyan Chicken Curry and Pilau Rice from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

 

Heritage Dish: Kenyan Chicken Curry and Pilau Rice from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

While my family always preferred chicken curry (mainly because the Pilau rice often had beef in it), variations include beef, lamb, fish, beans or eggplant. The key to curry is to let it simmer slowly so all the flavors are assimilated into the dish. You should not be able to taste the ginger, the garlic, or the spices distinctly. Rather, they should marry to create the curry flavor.

To this day, I make pilau, chicken curry and chapati when I have guests. If there are vegetarians in the group, I substitute the chicken for beans or eggplant, and it’s still delicious. These dishes will always be a major part of entertainment for me, thanks to my Kenyan heritage.

Heritage Dish: Kenyan Chicken Curry and Pilau Rice from Everyday Good Thinking, the official blog of @hamiltonbeach

 


Kenyan Chicken Curry
SERVES: 6

Ingredients
3 garlic cloves
2 oz. fresh ginger
1 1/4-1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch pieces
3 small red potatoes, cut into 1-inch cubes
1 small onion, chopped
1 can (14.5 oz.) diced tomatoes with basil, garlic and oregano
1 cup coconut milk
1 chili cube
1 Tablespoon curry paste
1 Tablespoon tomato paste
1 teaspoon curry powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 bay leaves
Instructions
Place garlic and ginger in pestle; press with mortar to make a paste. Add to slow cooker crock.
Stir remaining ingredients into paste until well blended.
Cover and cook on HIGH 2 1/2-3 hours or LOW 4 1/2-5 hours.
Serve with Pilau Rice.
Everyday Good Thinking http://everydaygoodthinking.com/

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33567The Stovetop-Safe Programmable Slow Cooker makes preparing a delicious family dinner easy. For starters, it comes with die-cast aluminum cookware that goes right onto the stove top for easy browning and sautéing. After that, creating a flavorful meal ahead of time is a simple matter of adding the other ingredients and setting the time and temperature.

 


Pilau Rice
SERVES: 6

Ingredients
1 ½ cups Basmati rice
1 Tablespoon olive oil
3 garlic cloves, minced
2 Tablespoons fresh grated ginger
1 1/2 teaspoons Pulao masala
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
Instructions
Place rice in rice cooker pot. Stir in olive oil to coat.
Add garlic, ginger, masala, cumin, turmeric and salt. Stir until well blended.
Add 4 cups water to cooking pot.
Cover and cook. Serve with Chicken Curry.
Notes
If using the plastic rice measurer included with the Digital Simplicity™ Rice Cooker and Food Steamer, 2 measures of rice will equal 1 ½ cups. When adding water, fill to the 2-line mark inside the pot.
Everyday Good Thinking http://everydaygoodthinking.com/

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37536The Digital Simplicity™ Rice Cooker and Food Steamer cooks perfect rice every time, but it does much more than that. Besides preparing all varieties of white and brown rice, the Digital Simplicity™ Rice Cooker steams food to perfection and cooks prepackaged pasta & rice mixes as well as nutritious, flavorful beans.



This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

In our Heritage Dish series, we feature Hamilton Beach employees and their favorite family recipes. This month, we highlight Pat Schweitzer, consumer test kitchen manager, and one of her favorite family dessert recipes inspired by life on a Jackson, Minnesota farm, Rhubarb Custard Pie.

In our family, it just wouldn’t be spring without mom’s Rhubarb Custard Pie. Tart rhubarb is the perfect complement to the sweet goodness of the custard on the bottom and the crunch of the crumb topping.

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

 

I grew up on a farm in southwest Minnesota. My mom Alyce traded in her teaching career to raise fruits, vegetables, chickens and her own brood of five children. At the end of her massive garden was a patch of rhubarb. If you’ve only seen the huge stalks in grocery stores, you have been missing the real thing! Rhubarb is a perennial vegetable that grows like crazy in cool weather, so it’s a natural for early Minnesota gardens. Although considered a vegetable, it’s mostly used like a fruit in desserts and jams. Only the stalk is edible, and the larger it grows, the more woody the stalk becomes and the less desirable it is for cooking.

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

If you had an abundance of rhubarb, you would make rhubarb cake, rhubarb bread, rhubarb crisp, rhubarb jam and, if you still had some left, you’d probably pass it on to friends and neighbors whose gardens were less productive. But despite rhubarb’s versatility, none of those treats compared to my Mom’s custard pie. Recently, as I was rummaging through my collection of handwritten recipes, I found four for this pie.I guess I wanted to be sure I had a copy!

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

My mom will tell you that one of her secrets to a perfect rhubarb pie is the pie pan. It is an all-aluminum deep dish pie pan. According to her, they don’t make them anymore, so she searches rummage sales, and when she finds them, she gives them to my sister, sisters-in-law and me. (Don’t tell her I now have two of them.)

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com

Making this pie is so easy. You just chop up the rhubarb and mix it with eggs, milk, sugar and flour. The recipe cards vary on the amount of sugar, and one version has nutmeg added. I go with the lower amount of sugar and leave out the nutmeg. I prefer it to be pretty tart with the rhubarb flavor as the star. You then pour the mixture into a pastry crust and top it with the crumb topping. After baking, the custard magically sinks to the bottom and the tart rhubarb filling gets sandwiched in the middle by the crumb topping.

This rhubarb custard pie from @HamiltonBeach's test kitchen is perfect for spring! everydaygoodthinking.com


Rhubarb Custard Pie
SERVES: 8

Ingredients
Pastry for 9-inch pie (Food Processor Pie Crust)
3 large eggs
3 Tablespoons milk
1 3/4 cups sugar
1/4 cup flour
4 cups sliced rhubarb
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 cup flour
Instructions
Preheat oven to 425°F.
Prepare Food Processor Pie Crust and place in 9-inch deep dish pie pan.
Lightly beat eggs. Add milk, sugar and flour. Stir in rhubarb. Pour into pie shell.
Mix topping ingredients until crumbly. Spread on top of rhubarb mixture.
Bake 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted in center comes out clean. Cool before cutting. Refrigerate remaining pie after serving.
Everyday Good Thinking http://everydaygoodthinking.com/

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62637

 

With the Soft Scrape™ Hand Mixer, you can mix without having to constantly stop to scrape the bowl. That’s because its unique Soft Scrape™ attachments thoroughly incorporate ingredients as you mix.



Heritage Dish: Whipped Cream Pound Cake featuring Annie Arnold - everydaygoodthinking / @hamiltonbeachIn our Heritage Dish series, we feature Hamilton Beach employees and their favorite family recipes. This month, we highlight Annie Arnold, Assistant Product Manager for hand and stand mixers, and one of her favorite family desserts, Nana’s Whipped Cream Pound Cake.

All family traditions are different, but one forever ingrained into my memory is Sunday Lunch at my Nana’s house. Every Sunday, Nana would prepare a huge meal that called our family in from a thirty mile radius. The heart of each meal was the abundance of vegetables grown in her garden (prepared southern style, of course). Meat was considered a side because vegetables were so plentiful, and the grand finale of dessert was always the best part.

Heritage Dish: Whipped Cream Pound Cake featuring Annie Arnold - everydaygoodthinking / @hamiltonbeach

Heritage Dish: Whipped Cream Pound Cake featuring Annie Arnold - everydaygoodthinking / @hamiltonbeach

There was not much variety in the menu, but there didn’t need to be. Everything tasted amazing and, in fact, the predictability of the menu created excitement for me. Have you ever heard a kid say they are excited about eating green beans? Doubtful, but I was that kid. The menu still has a strong effect on my diet with my love of vegetables being first in my now-vegetarian lifestyle, but desserts are a close second. Some days, all I need is piece of cake. Come on … you know those days!

Heritage Dish: Whipped Cream Pound Cake featuring Annie Arnold - everydaygoodthinking / @hamiltonbeach Heritage Dish: Whipped Cream Pound Cake featuring Annie Arnold - everydaygoodthinking / @hamiltonbeach

The dessert for Sunday Lunch varied, but special occasions like birthdays and holidays were always celebrated with a delicious whipped cream pound cake. Who needs a cake from the grocery store when you can make this? I consider this to be queen of all southern desserts. You know a good homemade pound cake when you don’t feel the need to smother it with whip topping or chocolate syrup.

Heritage Dish: Whipped Cream Pound Cake featuring Annie Arnold - everydaygoodthinking / @hamiltonbeach

Heritage Dish: Whipped Cream Pound Cake featuring Annie Arnold - everydaygoodthinking / @hamiltonbeach

A printable recipe is below so you can recreate the whipped cream pound cake recipe from my Nana. This pound cake, when done “Sunday Lunch-style,” is dense and moist with a slightly crunchy, golden-brown crust. YUM!

Try this southern queen for your next family gathering or as a gift. You’ll be part of the family at first bite. Enjoy!

Heritage Dish: Whipped Cream Pound Cake featuring Annie Arnold - everydaygoodthinking / @hamiltonbeach


Whipped Cream Pound Cake
YIELDS: 1 serving

Ingredients
1 cup butter, room temperature
3 cups sugar
6 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon almond or lemon extract
1 cup whipping cream
3 cups flour
Instructions
In a large mixing bowl, cream together butter and sugar on MEDIUM speed.
Add eggs, one at a time, and beat thoroughly after each addition.
Add vanilla and almond extract and continue mixing.
Reduce speed to LOW and alternately add cream and flour.
Pour batter into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for about 1 hour and 20 minutes at 325°F, or until tests done.
Everyday Good Thinking http://everydaygoodthinking.com/

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